Foreign tie-ups to boost skill development in India

Government of India has partnered with a host of foreign governments and private companies in order to develop human capacities across a variety of industries, leading to valuable skill transfer as well as crucial investments

April 4, 2018

The Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship (MSDE) through the “Skill India” initiative has engaged with several countries to boost knowledge transfer in skill training, technologies and setting up of adequate model of excellence

Foreign entities have tied up with Indian state agencies to reach out to Indian youth (below 35 years of age), who make up 65 per cent of the country’s 1.3 billion population; In the near future, India is touted to have a surplus workforce of 47 million

India’s partnership with entities from the UK, the USA, China, Germany, France, among other nations, have helped create numerous new jobs, while bringing in investments, innovations, technologies, best manufacturing practices and transnational standards

The Skill India mission, launched in July 2015, aims to train over 400 million people by 2022; By 2030, India’s workforce will have an average age of 32 years, in comparison, the same in the USA and China are expected to be 39 years and 43 years, respectively

India is touted to become the world’s youngest country by 2020 with an average age of 29 years. This brings forward exciting opportunities for skill development and strategic investments in India as the nation steps up to resolve the global shortage of quality workforce across a variety of sectors. To this effect, the Government has struck a number of critical partnerships with foreign and private entities to augment India’s rich human resource base. The Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship (MSDE) through the “Skill India” initiative has engaged with several countries to boost knowledge transfer in skill training, technologies and setting up of adequate model of excellence. In addition, active collaboration is being sought in the area of creation of international mobility through mapping of job roles and development of transnational standards. Overall, the strategy for International framework focuses around implementing the best practices in skill development of respective countries in India.

India’s strong 65 per cent youth demographic

The MSDE delegates projects through its affiliated agencies – the Directorate General of Training (DGT); the National Skill Development Agency (NSDA); the National Skill Development Corporation India (NSDC); the National Skill Development Fund (NSDF); Indian Institute of Entrepreneurship (IIE); the National Institute of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development (NIESBUD); and the Sector Skill Councils (SSC). These agencies collaborate with the broader society to improve youth employability through workshops focussed on basic vocational training to high-end engineering and technological coaching. Foreign entities have tied up with these agencies to reach out to Indian youth (those below 35 years of age), who make up 65 per cent of the country’s 1.3 billion population. In the near future, India is touted to have a surplus workforce of 47 million against a deficit of 10 million in China and 17 million in the USA. Aptly employing this workforce will help improve productivity and in turn income for all stakeholders.

The global interest is driven by the fact that by 2030, India’s workforce will have an average age of 32 years – a rare strength in the current global landscape.

 

India’s foreign partnerships in skill development

MSDE’s international partnerships have helped create numerous new jobs, while bringing in investments, innovations, technologies, best manufacturing practices and transnational standards. Some of the skill collaborations reached over the past few years include – a skill, innovation and research tie-up with the UK; an education and vocational training partnership with Germany; a transnational standards and vocational training tie-up with Australia; a college education and business training partnership with the USA; a college education and technical training collaboration with Canada; an education and skill development collaboration with Singapore; a partnership with the European Union in training related to best practices and labour force management; a talent management partnership with France; a technical and vocational training arrangement with Iran; a skill development and training centre establishment agreement with China; and a skill development and vocational training partnership with Sweden.

‘Skill India’ to train 400 million people by 2022

These partnerships involve both foreign state-backed business and academic/technical training institutions as well as privately-run enterprises. The global interest is driven by the fact that by 2030, India’s workforce will have an average age of 32 years – a rare strength in the current global landscape. In comparison, during the same period, the average age of workforce in the top two economies, the USA and China, is expected to be 39 years and 43 years, respectively. These partnerships are fueled by the Indian Government’s “Skill India” initiative, which aims to enhance resources for skill development and improve access to relevant training for the growing workforce. The government has offered special provision in the Union Budget for the financial year starting April 1st 2018 to equip youth with relevant industry skills. The Skill India mission, launched in July 2015, aims to train more than 400 million people by 2022. This promises strong future income growth for stakeholders involved in India’s skill programme.

India shining at WorldSkills competitions

India has also been organising “WorldSkills India”, an initiative that is leading the country’s participation at WorldSkills International competitions. Founded in 1950, WorldSkills is a partnership of around 75 countries to promote a global hub for skills excellence and development. WorldSkills brings experts together to give youth the chance to compete, experience, and learn how to become the best in their skill of choice. This offers unparalleled opportunities in skill and knowledge exchange with global peers. From the traditional trades to multi-skilled technology careers in the industry and service sectors, supported by partners, industries, governments, volunteers, and educational institutions, WorldSkills vision is to improve the world through the power of skills. India is an active participant on the WorldSkills platform as the nation prioritises preparing today’s workforce for tomorrow’s challenges. This essential as the job landscape if going tremendous change worldwide owing to technological disruptions.